Lesson 6 Quiz

Mark Each Question True (T) or False (F)

1

Because money is a means to acquire happiness, therefore the more money, the more happiness.  

2

Because it is our soul that must appear before God for judgment when we die, therefore what we do with our bodies or with other material possessions is of no interest to God.  

3

The purpose of the Catholic school is to carry on for your children the Catholic training that you will be giving them in your home. In other words, the Catholic school is an extension of your Catholic home.  

4

All poor people are automatically "poor in spirit."  

5

Consideration of such mundane matters as the economic aspect of your future marriage, detracts from the charm of your mutual love.  

6

In order to avoid arguments over money matters, you should decide now that either one of you should exclusively handle all the money.  

7

For a sound economic family life, you should be careful to spend more than you earn.  

8

To establish a sound budget, a husband should require his wife to account for every cent she spends for the upkeep of the home.  

9

It is the duty of every Christian housewife to give an example of patience and kindness by buying something from every salesman who comes to her door.  

10

A budget has no real practical value.  

11

In prosperous times, it is utter stinginess for a husband and wife to let themselves be guided by a sense of economy.  

12

The major aim of marriage from an economic point of view is to produce money profits.  

13

Food, clothing and lodging are only part of a familyís needs for virtuous living.  

14

It is obviously impossible for a couple to settle the question of the financial responsibilities of the household until after they marry and settle down.  

15

A coupleís standard of living is rigidly fixed by their income and so there is nothing they can gain from reading or study that could improve their conditions.  

16

Every bride should consider it her grave duty to keep on working outside the home throughout her married life in order to supplement her husbandís salary.  

17

The children whose mother works outside the home in order to earn "extras" for her family, would gain more from her personal guidance and care than from those "extras."  

18

For a husband who is still young, life insurance is a wise investment.  

19

The material preparation for the wedding is the most important thing about marriage.  

20

Childhood is the "happiest time of oneís life" and so children should not be expected to help around the house.  

21

To enjoy peace and harmony, a family must live within its income.  

22

For best results, the family budget should be planned for five years at a time.  

23

Although the budget is based on the past year, it can be of practical help for the future.  

24

A budget takes all the enjoyment out of married life.  

25

It is not enough for a budget to balance on paper.  

26

Sharing the chores around the home helps to link the members of the family more closely together.  

27

A balanced budget is necessarily a wise budget.  

28

A wise budget is necessarily a balanced budget.  

29

As far as possible, flexible expenditures should be kept permanently separated from fixed expenditures.  

30

If we do our best to live good lives and do our share, we may rightly expect that God will provide for our material needs (food, clothing, shelter, etc.)  

31

In view of the high cost of living, itís impossible and imprudent to include charitable donations or savings in any budget.  

32

In our income tax return, the Government allows us to make deductions for our donations to charity but not for our savings.  

33

A family with a large income would be foolish to waste time and energy on keeping a budget.  

34

The practice of economy should start long before marriage.  

35

Doing without necessities in order to save is highly praiseworthy.  

36

Unless one can put aside large amounts, thereís no point in trying to save.  

37

To do without something that is necessary in order to buy something useful is morally wrong.  

38

Itís perfectly all right to buy something superfluous even if doing so deprives us of something else that would be useful.  

39

The husband, by virtue of his vocation as ruler, is required to make all the decisions concerning the economic management of the home.  

40

At no age should children have any share in the management of the home.  

41

In order that home may be a pleasant place for the children, its administration should be entrusted entirely and exclusively to them.  

42

Being stingy is not the way to achieve self-discipline in money matters.  

43

The practice of economy being concerned strictly with financial matters, it has no moral effects whatsoever.  

44

It is a betrayal of trust for a young woman to ask her future husband about his financial position and his prospects for supporting a family adequately.  

45

Mutual suspicion concerning money matters is necessary between husbands and wives in order to protect the familyís financial welfare.  

46

When going shopping, it is a wise practice, whenever possible, to make up the buying list at home beforehand.  

47

A young couple planning on marriage should take advantage of sales and buy their furniture before they look for a place to live.  

48

Articles that cost practically nothing are superfluous and expensive if they cannot be used to advantage.  

49

In the financial administration of the home, a spirit of broadmindedness between husband and wife is fine in theory but impossible in practice.  

50

Membership in a credit union has special advantages.